No Place an Exhibition by Jean Brundrit

Brundrit invite
  • 04/05/16
  • Time: 18h00
  • Venue: Wits Anthropology Museum
  • Contact: Contact Patricia on Patricia.Hadebe@wits.ac.za or 011-717 9737

Please join the Wits City Institute and the Anthropology Museum for the opening of No Place an Exhibition by Jean Brundrit

In the exhibition No Place, artist Jean Brundrit is interested in the notion of an ephemeral place, a place that remains undefined and temporary that is more of a space than a place. She considers the transience of the form of a wave and the sea, as a visual manifestation of this concept. To this end she is exhibiting a number of ‘seascapes’ as well as images that reflect on mapping and data collection.

Included in the exhibition is an artwork in book-form, Big Sea. Through the pages of Big Sea, the viewer embarks on a journey of discovery – in both temporal and geographic terms. Brundrit combines her own images with archival photographs. These were taken in the late 1920s by Captain R.L.V. Shannon, who skippered a research vessel in the Western Antarctic region, and contemporary photographs taken in the Southern Ocean by her father, Geoff Brundrit, an oceanographer. Brundrit’s photographs converse with those from the archives of her father and Shannon, creating visual dialogues across time and space.

Jean Brundrit is a visual artist who works with photographic media. She has exhibited extensively in South Africa and contributed to a number of international exhibitions. Brundrit is a NRF rated researcher and is a Senior Lecturer at the Michaelis School of Fine Art, University of Cape Town where she teaches photography. She is interested in how photography has influenced the way we understand the world and what it enables us to see.

Her research interests are primarily concerned with exploring the environment and identity, specifically lesbian identity and strategies of representation within a South African context. Her work pertaining to the environment is focused on the impact of rapid climate change and how this is represented in art, as well as the interconnectedness of humans and their relationship to the natural world.

Jean is a visiting research fellow at Wits City Institute.

RSVP: Friday 29 April: Patricia Hadebe

Patricia.Hadebe@wits.ac.za or 011-717 9737

Directions to the WITS Anthropology Museum

Please use the Yale Rd entrance from De Korte Street. Go through security and find parking on the left hand side just after the building next to the Security boom. Proceed on foot to the traffic lights and turn right into the East Campus. On your immediate right will be the South West Engineering Building – the building following that one is Central Block, use the entrance between the two buildings and you will immediately be on West corridor – walk to the Museum next to CB15.